National Garden Week: A Look at Some of our Favorite Gardens by RGC Members

National Garden Week: A Look at Some of our Favorite Gardens by RGC Members

We are closing out our National Garden Week posts with a look at favorite gardens members have visited, pictures from Lisa’s recent visit to Gibbs Garden, and pics from a few members’ gardens–the feature image for this post is from Mary Ann Booth Cabot’s backyard. We hope you are as inspired by these gardens as we are. Thanks for celebrating National Garden Week with us.

Debbie V suggests we add visiting these gardens on our bucket lists:

Image from https://www.lewisginter.org/aloverofroses/rose-garden-2/

 

 

 

Gretchen C’s 3 favorite gardens to visit in the United States are:

Image from longwoodgardens.org

1. Longwood Gardens in Kennet Square, PA. These gardens are located just 30 minutes from where I lived the first 30 years of my life, so I have been there innumerable times. The gardens are known for their fountains, architecture, and green houses. In 1798 an arboretum was planted at this location. In 1906, Pierre S. DuPont really developed the garden with structures and more plantings. It was opened to the public in 1921. There are over 1,077 acres with 4.5 acres of greenhouses and a 5 acre fountain area. In addition, there are buildings enclosing a theater and world class organ as well as an outdoor theater where one can see a play or musical in the summer.

The Philadelphia area’s climate is a zone that encourages many types of horticulture and for this reason there is much to see in the extensive outdoor gardens. The Christmas Decorations in the large conservatories are magnificent.

I first visited as a child but remember most vividly taking my own children there in strollers. At that time there was no admission charge and a friend and I would go frequently with our young children. A favorite spot was an outdoor water feature that flowed down a large stone stairway. After moving north to New Jersey and then Connecticut, I would visit my parents in December, take them to see the Christmas Decorations, and have dinner in the restaurant.

2. Portland, Oregon Japanese Garden. There are many Japanese Gardens in the world. This one is situated on 12 acres on a wooded hillside west of the city. It is a tranquil spot with 8 separate different styles of Japanese Gardens. Water runs through the gardens as falls and pools, adding to the enchantment. In addition to the tea house there are other small Japanese style buildings. There is a Koi Pond and many moss coated structures. The numerous Japanese Maples are not to be missed. If you have visited Portland, you know that horticulture in that area is more abundant than many other places. This is due to ample moisture and moderate temperatures.

3. Of the gardens I have visited, our Atlanta Botanical Garden is my other favorite. No need to tell you as I know you all must love it too!

 

Lisa E shared these beautiful pictures from her recent visit to Gibbs Gardens, a world-class garden in Ball Ground, GA, a few miles north of Roswell.

         

 

Linda Lee P shared these gorgeous pictures from Miramar Beach.

   

 

Carolyn H shared images of her remarkable daylilies.

       

                   

           

 

Mary Ann Booth Cabot shared glorious pictures from her garden.

     

 

National Garden Week: Go Green with a 100% Solar Powered Fountain by RGC Blogger Suzy Crowe

National Garden Week: Go Green with a 100% Solar Powered Fountain by RGC Blogger Suzy Crowe

I love fountains. Their sound is soothing, happy music to me, they attract wildlife, and they give birds a place to drink and bathe. This spring I decided to convert a wet area in my landscape to a fountain. The wet area was a bog I created with reeds and yellow iris in my grandfather’s 55 gallon cast iron scalding pot. I was planning to go with a fountain with an electric pump until I came across the cute little ZETIY 100% solar bird bath fountain that doesn’t require a battery or electricity. You can’t get any greener than that! In addition, it only cost $16.70. It sounded like a win-win for me and for the birds.

When the fountain came in, I decided to test it before clearing out the boggy mess in the scalding pot that would become a fountain. The fountain was very easy to put together — I just had to put the pump into a clamp on the underside of the fountain and test out the 4 nozzles that came with the fountain. It took me a little while to figure out how the pump fit in the clamp, so I took a picture of the bottom of the fountain in case you decide to get your own fountain.

 

 

Once the pump was clamped down, it was on to testing the fountain. I used a large metal bowl and tested each nozzle. The nozzles were very easy to change and had a nice array of spray-patterns. I got a nice little sprinkle from the nozzle I ended up choosing. I also fell in love with the sound of the fountain–I could tell it was going to be well worth the time it would take to clean out the scalding pot. Here’s my video of the test.

 

Next I moved on to cleaning out the swamp. I forgot to take a picture of it before I started, but here’s what it looked like when I was close to the end. I transplanted the iris and the reeds in a shady area of my yard that has poor drainage. So far, they are still living and growing.

Once I cleared out all of the plants and as much of the dirt as I could, I filled the fountain with water. As you can see, there was a ton of vermiculite in the water. Why oh why did I use ancient potting soil when I created the bog? After a feeble attempt to float out some of the vermiculite, I had a brainstorm–I could use wire mesh to scoop out the pesky stuff. That worked quite well. I scooped out all of the vermiculite I could see, let the water settle for a while, then I scooped out more. Scoop, settle, repeat. Scoop, settle, repeat. After a while, the vermiculite was gone.

Since the fountain is 100% solar, there is no moving water at night. I needed to figure out a way to prevent mosquitoes without harming the wildlife. I needed an environmentally friendly biological solution. Lucky for me, I faced this same problem with the bog, so I just added some Mosquito Bits I had on hand. I have to add a few more bits every two weeks, but Mosquito Bits are a great solution.

A day or so after I finished the scooping, the water was clear as a bell. Now I’m seeing a lot more wildlife activity in my yard–I’ve seen nuthatches, house finches, brown thrashers, robins, blue jays, cardinals, a hawk, other birds whose species I don’t know, chipmunks, squirrels, and, as you can see in the featured image at the top of this post, a little frog sitting on the right side of the rim that thinks it has found a new home.

This is a great little project–I highly recommend it to you. It’s a win-win for wildlife and for the intrepid gardener.

National Garden Week: Feeding…& Watering…the Birds by RGC Bloggers Lisa Ethridge & Suzy Crowe

National Garden Week: Feeding…& Watering…the Birds by RGC Bloggers Lisa Ethridge & Suzy Crowe

A song in the children’s movie, Mary Poppins, features a woman selling birdseed crooning, “Come feed the little birds; show them you care.” It turns out, she’s right. Feeding the birds during the winter is a popular pastime which increases the survival rate of our feathery friends. But what about during the summer? There are mixed opinions about that, but more about that later. Whether or not you feed the birds in the summer, everyone agrees that birds need water year round. Wild birds need fresh water to drink and to bathe. Many bird aficionados incorporate birdbaths or ponds in their gardens to meet the birds’ needs.  Birds flock to these water features, especially those with moving water. As a bonus, in the summer these water features may attract new baby birds hanging out with their parents.

So water features are a go year round. What about feeding the birds? The Humane Society article Feeding Your Backyard Birds says the only birds we should feed in the summer are hummingbirds and goldfinches. Hummingbirds need nectar in the summer due to their high metabolism. Goldfinches nest later than other birds, so they need nyjer seed in the summer until the thistles go to seed.

Unlike the Humane Society, the National Wildlife Federation offers considerations for feeding wild birds in the summer. The article Summer Bird Feeding: the Case For and Against points out that you might want to feed the birds in the summer so you’ll be visited by birds that don’t live in your area in the winter. It’s up to you to decide whether to take down your bird feeders in the summer.

Lucky for us, Georgia’s winter appeals to a lovely assortment of seed-eating, fruit-eating, and insect-eating birds who look for sustenance in shrubs and trees as well as on the ground. So it’s important to provide different types of food and to use an assortment of feeders if you want to maximize your bird-watching experience.

When it comes to bird feeding supplies, a visit to a specialty bird store can provide valuable information, guarantee fresh seed, and showcase quality accessories. Purchase table-like feeders for ground-feeding birds such as sparrows and towhees. Hopper and tube feeders are best for shrub and treetop species such as finches and cardinals. Suet feeders—for cool to cold weather only—will attract woodpeckers, nuthatches, and chickadees. Be sure to buy sturdy, good-quality feeders that are easy to clean. Cats running loose in the neighborhood are the bane of a bird feeder’s existence. Make sure to place feeders out of predators’ reach.

Different types of food will attract a diverse mix of birds. Black oil sunflower appeals to the greatest number of birds. Feeding nyjer/thistle seed is a tasty treat for finches, but be sure it’s fresh; the birds will not eat stale seed. Waxwings, bluebirds, mockingbirds and other fruit/berry eaters enjoy raisins and currants soaked in water overnight and placed on a table feeder. Fill one feeder with peanuts and nuts to attract nuthatches, titmice, and woodpeckers. When purchasing blends, avoid those with milo, wheat, and oats which do not appeal to most birds. Store the seed in an airtight container to keep it fresh.

Bird feeding and watching can be inspirational and educational. For further reading, the Doug Tallamy, University of Delaware professor’s book Bringing Nature Home and its accompanying website are highly regarded tools to enlighten you about biodiversity, the importance of native gardening, and to move toward biodiversity.

The featured image for this post was taken by Stephanie L’s husband Phil. JoAnn J…woodpecker, Debbie J…brown thrasher, Sherron L…hawk, and Linda B…fledgling nuthatch that they have been watching since the mother built a nest in a birdhouse in their yard… provided the other pictures. As you can see, RGC members love to Feed the Birds…and water them.

   

 

National Garden Week: What are RGC Members Doing During the Stay-at-Home?

National Garden Week: What are RGC Members Doing During the Stay-at-Home?

Here are RGC member responses to How have you spent your time during the virus?

From Dotty E

While honoring guidelines, I have spent my time doing projects around my home that I had put off for a long time–still lots to do. But I was able to do some organizing, exterior siding replacement and painting, and some interior painting. 

Lots of reflection on what I truly value as we have had to isolate and even refrain from gathering at our places of worship. I have decided that I will more mindfully give thanks daily for all my blessings large and small and to help others along the way. 

I have not done a lot of additional planting in the garden, but I have been formulating some plans for the type outcome I desire and will resume some planting in the fall. But lots of weeding was done during this time. 

We adopted an abused dog and have had to work really hard to help him overcome his fears and challenges. He has come a long way but still a long way to go. It has been heartbreaking to realize how scared he has been before us, and we are determined to make a difference. 

From Dorothy J

The time I had during lockdown I spent working in my garden. I was able to clean and manicure my flower beds to get ready for planting. I also did some craft projects like painting some big flower pots that I had sitting in my garage for years. Now they look great in the garden (note: one of these pots was yesterday’s blog post image). Also did a lot of spring cleaning, reading and created cookbooks of my recipes to give to my daughters. Take care and stay well, Dorothy J

From Gretchen C

Thought more and rushed less! Contacted distant friends and local friends who might need a call. Read and read and read…now on Book 17…most borrowed on-line from the library. Made Prayer Quilts. Felt Gratitude: for a period of change to relax, for the good fortune to not be affected adversely by Covid, for an amazing church which has been in touch every day during this time!

From Lisa E

I channeled Marie Kondo for the first few weeks of lockdown. It’s hard to let things go, isn’t it? I read somewhere that she recommends having approximately 34 books in your house. I could never live with that. I love my books. I worked in the garden a lot and planted a bigger veggie garden than I have in many years. I hope I can keep up with it. I’ve spend some time in Ohio with family—feeling the gratitude like never before. Early in April, I accepted a part-time job at Scottsdale Farms Nursery. It’s a pretty physical job, and that’s been good for me. I look forward to working there throughout the changing seasons. I miss you all and look forward to a time when we can garden, learn, and socialize.

From Florence Anne B

This time apart allowed me the unique opportunity to compile the largest ever to do list—mostly outside, and chip away at it daily with only the weather to interrupt. I thrived on it. Tackled stuff that had been pending for years. It is by no means finished because gardening never is, but it has been rewarding to totally immerse in nature on a daily basis.  And very therapeutic!  Especially now.

From Linda Lee P

I went to Miramar Brach for almost two weeks which has helped me immensely to survive some of this time plus reconnect with my happy place–the beach. 

Beautiful flowers, fresh air, sunshine and the surf washing upon the sand. God was ever present and I could breathe freely. (note: the image for this blog post is from Linda Lee’s trip).

 From Suzy C

 I’ve had a blast with my gardening endeavors during the stay-at-home period. I cleaned out some existing beds, battling ivy, honey suckle, poison ivy, and vinca major. They aren’t eradicated, but they are under control now. In a newly-cleared area under my ancient oak, I planted some shade-loving divisions my friend Lisa gifted me.

I’ve divided some hydrangeas and bulbs. I distributed the divisions around my grounds :). Some are in newly-cleaned beds, others are spending a season in containers. I spent about 20 hours on blog entries for Garden Week in Georgia, and another 40 hours or so immersed in the Virtual Chelsea Flower Show. I’m sure I’ll spend several hours on blog entries for National Garden Week.

I bought a cute little battery-free solar fountain and am cleaning out my grandfather’s cast iron scalding pot to convert into a home for the solar fountain (note: one of this week’s blog posts is about this). I’m about to transform an old wrought-iron chair into a planter. My hammock stand has a new hammock and a new location perfect for hanging out and reading.

 On my upcoming list:…I’ve signed up for the free online 2020 Fiber Symposium https://www.fiberartssymp.com/schedule from June 19th to the 27th. If you check out the schedule, I’m especially interested in the Antique Stone Lady Bust session and the Sculpt an Owl session to learn how to make accoutrements for my gardens. Hope you can join me at the symposium.

I plan to turn an old table and an old baker’s stand into a potting station. Also, I’ve realized the old wooden swing set/fort in my back yard is NOT an old wooden swing set/fort — it’s a folly! I see lots of opportunity exploring that idea. And let’s not forget mowing the grass. Maybe I’ll convert the front yard into a meadow.

National Garden Week: Add Color in June by RGC Blogger Lisa Ethridge

National Garden Week: Add Color in June by RGC Blogger Lisa Ethridge

If a quick survey of your yard in June reveals a mostly green palette, it’s time to add some color. June is the perfect time to make attractive and family-friendly additions to the greenspace and outdoor living areas of your home.

The addition of blooming plants can really be eye catching. Pick an area of the yard that needs brightening and add a spot of color. Borders, pots, hanging baskets, and trellises are popular. When you go to the nursery or garden department, look for vital, green specimens that are in bloom and ready to set out in the garden. Choose plants that meet your sun/shade needs and select different sizes, varieties, and textures. For baskets and pots, make sure to buy some trailing plants to make your arrangement more flowing and artistic.

Remember, it’s all about the soil; before planting, be sure to recharge the soil in the pot or bed with compost. Water the new specimen while it’s still in its pot.Then plant at the recommended depth and space according to instructions on the tag. Once your bed or pot is planted, water thoroughly.  To maintain the beautiful color throughout the season, water regularly, deadhead if needed, and fertilize monthly.

Think outside of the pot when it comes to color. Paint is cheap and easy to apply. Spray paint is now specially formulated to adhere to plastic and other materials. Tasteful colors abound, and some paints simulate beautiful textures. Think about painting pots and grouping them in harmonious vignettes. Vary the pot sizes and shapes to make things more interesting and stick with odd numbered arrangements.

Accessories can add color without taxing the budget. Big box nurseries and stores with garden centers have a great deal of space devoted to yard art. Some well-chosen pieces can add interest and color to the landscape—just don’t overdo it.  If you don’t feel comfortable making selections, take a friend whose garden you admire.

The featured image for this post is one of Dorothy J’s stay-at-home projects. She painted a red pot that didn’t work in her color palette and turned it into a brilliant spot of color in her yard.

For help with all aspects of planting annuals, download brochure B954: Flowering Annuals for Georgia Gardens at extension.uga.edu/publications.

National Garden Week: Inspired by Chelsea…Ideas & Comments from the Virtual Chelsea Flower Show by RGC Blogger Suzy Crowe

National Garden Week: Inspired by Chelsea…Ideas & Comments from the Virtual Chelsea Flower Show by RGC Blogger Suzy Crowe

For the first time ever, the Chelsea Flower Show was virtual instead of in-person. I took advantage of that and spent hours being inspired & educated. There were fantastic walking tours of famous horticulturalists’ (think Adam Frost, Kazuyuki Ishihara, James Alexander Sinclair, Tom Massey, Andy Sturgeon) home gardens. I perused floral design demonstrations, how-to videos on growing specific plants, cooking demonstrations using home-grown veg and herbs, and suggestions for gardening with kids.

I loved the daily Ask a Gardening Advisor sessions which were primed by write-in-questions on given topics. Panels of experts on each given topic answered the questions. These sessions ranged from establishing a wildflower garden/lawn to everything related to houseplants; from how to get rid of pests to how to care for ponds.

My friend Mary & I loved Tips for Summer Design with gold-medal-winning garden designer Sarah Eberle–the session is inspirational and informative.

Now that Chelsea is over, I have notes on *and have started* propagating succulents; I’ve moved the baker’s rack from my patio to my carport to create a potting station. I’ve given my bulbs haircuts so that they can absorb necessary nutrients without looking like a total mess in my gardens. I’ve converted my grandfather’s cast iron scalding pot into a pond with a solar fountain–you’ll hear more about this in another post. I’m researching turning my front yard into a wildflower yard. I have found where east is in relation to my yard, and this fall I’ll be turning my iris so their rhizomes all face east. I’m sitting in my yard, looking & dreaming. And every morning, I’m walking the grounds with a cup of coffee.

Want to see what you missed? You’ll find all 53 sessions on the Royal Horticultural Society’s YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/user/RoyalHorticulturalSo . I hope you’ll be amazed and inspired. When you get to the YouTube channel, you’ll see that the image for this post is the opening screen for the Virtual Chelsea Flower Show 2020. As such it is copyrighted by the Royal Horticultural Society. Let me know if you, too, are inspired by Chelsea. Cheers!